From Our Editors: Selected Articles on Post-Pandemic Planning

  • From Mary Burns on Edutopia:

Getting Ready to Teach Next Year

  • From Emily Tate on EdSurge:

What Will Schools Do in the Fall? Here Are 4 Possible Scenarios

  • From Heather C. Hill & Susanna Loeb on Education Week:

How to Contend with Pandemic Learning Loss

  • From Gene Kerns and Katie McClarty on EdSurge:

How Schools Can Prepare for a Very Different Kind of School Year

  • From Sarah Cooper on Edutopia:

Distance Learning Strategies to Bring Back to the Classroom

  • From Susan Page on USA Today:

Back to school? 1 in 5 teachers are unlikely to return to reopened classrooms this fall, poll says

  • From David Saleh Rauf on Education Week:

Will COVID-19 Spur Greater Use of Artificial Intelligence in K-12 Education?

  • From Gina Denny on Education Week Teacher:

6 Classroom Changes Teachers Will Make When Schools Reopen

  • From Erika Christakis on The Atlantic:

For Schools, the List of Obstacles Grows and Grows

  • From Sarah Gonser on Edutopia:

How Long-Term Tech Planning Pays Off—Now and In the Future

In the Age of COVID-19, Don’t Overlook the Gifted Student

By Todd Stanley

Even before this massive school shutdown, some schools and teachers were finding difficulties in coming up with ways to challenge their gifted students. We cannot overlook these students in the virtual classroom either. Here are five things teachers can do to meet the needs of gifted children in a virtual classroom:

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A Wakeup Call for Differentiation

By David Nurenberg

Even if a course is designated “honors” or “remedial,” anyone who has taught real children knows that there is no such thing as a homogenous class—unless it has just one student. Forty years of research tells us that just because two dozen students share a classroom, it doesn’t mean a one-size-fits-all approach will serve them.

Thanks to the pandemic, those students don’t even share a physical classroom anymore. Students are in so many different situations vis a vis their ability to engage with class, and the amount of support they have available at home, that we can no longer harbor any illusions that “teaching to the middle” will suffice.

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A Tactical Plan for Learning Gaps: What to Expect Post COVID-19

By Suzy Pepper Rollins

School hallways have been still for weeks. Normally bustling cafeterias, sports fields, and playgrounds prolongingly silent.  But most importantly, classrooms have been empty.  No science labs, no sharing of writing, no dissecting of poetry with an elbow partner, and no exploratory math stations.  No nods of approval by teachers or laughter at humorous sections of a novel.  No leaning over to a classmate’s desk for assurance on a tough math problem.   

What will the learning toll be on millions of students whose educational experiences were abruptly switched to remote, often online, learning?  Some learners may have barely skipped an academic beat and will return to school ready to move on. Others may have experienced daily frustrations.  And many will fall somewhere in between. 

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3 Ways to “Get Grounded” at the Beginning of Hosting Your Online Session

By Caitlin Krause

Students feel our sense of presence, connection and care as teachers, and this greatly impacts their learning, whether it’s in an online space or in a physical classroom. When moving classes online, we might naturally get so caught up in the technology (Is the platform stable? Is there latency? Can everyone hear and see each other?) that we’re a bit frazzled and frantic in our energy instead of present, calm and receptive.

What should be a joyful coming together feels stressful, and our impulse might be to jump straight to the expected topic at hand or content. We might forget that connection trumps content—and, in fact, connection is what will give that content context and meaning. So, it’s a necessary base. As online community hosts, our role now involves inviting everyone to our virtual home. What is our greeting at the threshold? How are we sending messages, implicit and explicit, that “All Are Welcome”?

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